Monday, 28 February 2011

Sitzfleisch

The word for today is Sitzfleisch. If, like me, you immediately inferred from this word's German components - sitzen, to sit, and Fleisch, flesh - that it referred to the additional padding of the bottomular region arising from one's deskjob, you would be, like me, wrong. In fact it means something like "staying power". Sitzfleisch is the stuff that keeps you resolute in your chair when all others have run off into the gloaming to chase butterflies.

P.S., while considering synonyms for "bottomular region" (dismissing "derrière" - too frou-frou - and "sit-upon" - too Girl Guides-ish), I googled "the fundament", and happened upon this essential information: the ancient Athenian punishment for adultery was the insertion of a radish "up the fundament" (quoth my source), a sentence so regularly meted out that the verb for "I insert a radish up the fundament" was ραφανιδοω (rhapanidoô), from the Greek for radish, ραφανος (rhaphanos). People pay big money for that kind of treatment these days. And radishes aren't cheap since the floods either.

So there you go. Lexicon Harlot, Demonstrating that You Can Chase Butterflies without Leaving Your Deskchair since 2006.

P.P.S., I just realised that I have made light of state-mandated sexual assault. If you are reading this and you are a legislator, please be advised that the radish manoeuvre described above constitutes a violation of a person's human rights according to international law, and furthermore that radishes are only nutritionally valuable if taken orally and consensually.

7 comments:

The Elephant's Child said...

Ouch. And shame on you. I used to really like radishes, and will look at them quite differently (for a while a least).

TimT said...

Leading to the old joke, 'Why, you look positively radishing today!'

Alexis, Baron von Harlot said...

Just don't get sprung committing adultery with any ancient Athenians, TEC, and your relationship with radishes should remain unsullied.

Alexis, Baron von Harlot said...

Tim: say that too often and too loudly and you'll become a hoarse radish. x.

Alexis, Baron von Harlot said...

On the subject of etymology and radishes, it is my opinion that the word "radish" comes from the Latin word for root, "radix" (which also gives us "radical"). It is also my opinion that were I to search the pertinent pockets of pre-existing scholarship I would find confirmation of my opinion. Isn't that interesting.

Mitzi G Burger said...

It is all interesting, Baron. Radishes are also excellent with finely chopped mint and Greek fetta cheese (although perhaps not the ancient Athenian kind.)

Alexis, Baron von Harlot said...

Salad expert. That's what you are.